• I don't speak Chinese (yet). Will I be able to survive in China?

    Looking forward to putting that Chinese major to work?

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    I don't speak Chinese (yet). Will I be able to survive in China?
    Looking forward to putting that Chinese major to work? The bad news is that, even for those with conversational level Chinese, technical vocabulary can be a major obstacle for newcomers to China. Previous students have quickly discovered that unfamiliarity with the technical words associated with renting a property and getting established has caused much aggravation, wasted time and frustration. The good news is that our team will handle the tricky stuff, allowing you to make friends and enjoy the process. Previous students have found that a mixture of letting someone handle the practical stuff for them whilst taking language classes to be the most enjoyable and convenient formula.
  • I've heard rumors that it's possible to work in China during my ex

    I've heard rumors that it's possible to work in China during my exchange. Is it true? In fact it is possible to teach English at selected locations with your student visa and many students have successfully pursed internships in Beijing.

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    I've heard rumors that it's possible to work in China during my ex
    In fact it is possible to teach English at selected locations with your student visa and many students have successfully pursed internships in Beijing. Beijing Buddy will help fix you up with something that's right for you. All you need to do is ask us: either now at Ben@beijingbuddy.com or when you arrive.
  • Are there any international banks with branches in China?

    Are there any international banks with branches in China? Can I open a bank account when I arrive in Beijing?

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    Are there any international banks with branches in China?
    Whilst some people staying a week or two will just try to find the one or two branches of their home bank in Beijing, the majority of exchange students choose to open a Chinese bank account. This allows for easy and convenient ATM withdrawals throughout the city. Our team are on hand to help with the process of opening a Chinese bank account so you can enjoy stress-free banking.
  • Should I bring cash? Will my credit/debit cards work in China?

    Cash is more preferred in China. It's easy to overspend in the first few weeks, especially if you're withdrawing vast amounts of RMB using your debit card from home (not to mention those extra charges). 

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    Should I bring cash? Will my credit/debit cards work in China?
    Cash is more preferred in China. It's easy to overspend in the first few weeks, especially if you're withdrawing vast amounts of RMB using your debit card from home (not to mention those extra charges). Visitors often can't believe how much they burn through in the first few weeks. Getting your Chinese account set up in the first few days will save your money for the essentials and save time. We’ll help you through the process and keep your spending sane upon arrival.
  • What are normal living expenses in China?

    What are normal living expenses in China? How much money should I expect to spend?

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    What are normal living expenses in China?
    Living in Beijing is relatively more expensive than in other Chinese cities. Our Chinese team estimates you may spend between $350 to $700 a month, but an American team member has lived comfortably on $100 a month. We recommend that you do bring more cash as it is not as convenient to exchange money in Beijing as one would think.
  • What kind of clothing should I bring, and how much?

    Bring your "normal clothes"

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    What kind of clothing should I bring, and how much?
    Bring your "normal clothes" - Chinese youth dress conservatively but fashionably. Bring good shoes, as western sizes are sometimes difficult to find. Bring fewer rather than more clothes, as it is fairly cheap to buy clothes in China.

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